Topic: Community-Shared Solar

Community-Shared Solar Articles

Developing Nations Build Distributed Energy Solutions

Adoption of solar power and microgrid technologies has been on the rise in frontier and growth markets. This trend results from declining equipment costs and increasing support from development funds, government programs, and impact investors. But there is much room to fill. There are as many as 1.1 billion people around the globe who still don’t have access to a reliable supply of electricity. Microgrids can help address the issue without expensive transmission and distribution infrastructure.

Will a National Green Bank Act Win Support?

A number of senators and representatives led by Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) and Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D-Conn.) have cosponsored The Green Bank Act of 2017 (PDF) (S. 1406. H.R. 2995). The act is expected to support the establishment of a national green bank capitalized with $10 billion in treasury-issued green bonds. This is the third time legislators have proposed it.
Empire State Building exterior

Honing Solar Financing Tools Can Build the Market

How can solar financing be improved in the United States? Experts shared their vision for the future at the Green Investing Conference held by the Information Management Network (IMN) on April 27 in New York City. Attendees included energy investors, rating agencies, legal counsel, and other professionals. The opening panel, “The Green Landscape for Investing: What, When, Where and Why?” addressed both current situations and future goals.

New York Debates How to Finance Low-Income Solar

In most of the United States, low-to-moderate-income (LMI) communities have little to no voice about how solar energy can bring jobs and economic stability. New York is an exception. The state held an extended dialogue on this subject this year through the CDG Low-Income Collaborative. Although the New York Public Service Commission (NYPSC) dismissed the committee’s recommendations, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) decided to put some of them in place.

United States Wants Local Banks to Invest in Community-Shared Solar

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) announced this July that it plans to host an event to bring together local bankers and regulators to discuss expanding community solar nationally. With only a few months remaining in 2016, the federal administration is taking small actions that may last long after President Obama leaves office.

Building Climate Resilience in Native American Communities

In the Navajo Nation, electricity may be a fragile commodity as climate change intensifies. Other tribes in the United States face similar energy quandaries. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) announced on Sept. 2 that it is requesting applications to co-fund renewable energy, energy efficiency, and combined heat and power to help increase the climate resilience of indigenous communities. The available funding is estimated to total around $4-6 million. Applications are due by Dec. 10.

Minnesota’s New Clean-Energy Policy: Two Years Later

How has Minnesota’s Omnibus Energy Bill, HF 2834, changed the climate for clean energy in the state since its signature on May 24, 2013? Heralded as a bold action to make Minnesota a national leader in clean energy, the multifaceted bill established a solar carve-out in addition to the state’s existing renewable portfolio standard. It also created a community solar program and reformed Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) policies. However, perhaps the most significant change was the new law’s use of the Value of Solar model that replaced net metering.

Is the White House’s Solar Commitment on Target?

When the White House announced a multipronged solar commitment that benefits low-to-moderate-income communities, the decision did not take place in a vacuum. Although most news coverage has simply focused on the federal statement, a more in-depth look shows this thorny challenge has blocked progress for the solar industry for a long time. According to some researchers, this commitment does not provide a complete solution.

Three Strategies for Low-Income Solar Programs

The phrase ‘low-income’ rarely appears in solar energy press coverage in the United States. But some enterprising organizations have set their sights on expanding the market for residential solar photovoltaics to include low-to-moderate-income communities. Three approaches – group discount programs, affordable leases, and community solar installations – are making solar power available to these communities in some states.