Topic: Solar Finance

Solar Finance Articles

Fifth Water Hot Springs, Utah

Real Asset Impact Investing Fuels Sustainability

According to the International Energy Agency, $3.5 trillion USD of clean energy investments is needed each year through 2050 to offset the rise in carbon emissions. At the same time, an underinvestment in global infrastructure has restricted reliable access to key resources such as energy, sanitation and water. A recent study, “The Financial Performance of Real Assets Impact Investments,” conducted by Cambridge Associates and Global Impact Investing Network, shows that investments in real asset impact funds can profitably address both of these issues and help improve the livelihoods of billions of people.

How Small Islands Can Transition to Renewable Energy

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are on the front line of climate change, facing the damage of shrinking coastlines and the ravages of tropical storms. However, these 57 island nations around the world can attempt to address this global challenge by relying on their renewable resources including sunshine, wind, hydropower and biomass. The topic was the subject of multiple events in November at COP23 in Bonn, Germany.

Private Capital for Resilience Financing Has Arrived

Momentum is building in the private sector for climate resilience financing. This necessary acceleration could help to avert the worst consequences of climate change. Financiers and others weighed in about their priorities and goals at COP23 in Germany on Nov. 13 in the Bonn Zone. They shared their thoughts and successes from developing pathways for resilience financing.
Electronics circuit board detail

Blockchain May Bring Transparency to Renewable Energy

In 2017, a number of companies have been working to use blockchain technology to enable alternative markets for energy trading and models for renewable energy financing. The more prominent ones include Suncontract, PowerLedger and Wepower. This may result in increased transparency for energy transactions.
Purple flower

Climate Finance Is Failing to Reach a Local Level, Study Finds

As world leaders met in Bonn, Germany in November for COP23, the challenge of climate finance projects in developing countries took center stage. A second challenge receives less attention: fewer than 10 percent of development finance from international climate funds reaches the local level. This finding is presented in a paper called “Delivering Real Change: Getting International Climate Finance to the Local Level.” It was published by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), a London-based policy-research group.
Coral at the Monterey Aquarium

Global Frameworks for Financing Sustainable Infrastructure

As decision makers gathered at COP23 this November in Bonn, Germany, they considered strategies that could empower them to reach the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Financing sustainable infrastructure is one of the keys to putting these goals in motion. According to Laura Canas da Costa, senior advisor in sustainable infrastructure financing at WWF Switzerland, developing nations will be building extensive amounts of infrastructure as they pursue the SDGs. Traditionally, up to 70 percent of infrastructure financing comes from the public sector.
Toronto financial district

Companies Explore Creative Ways to Purchase Renewable Energy

What are the creative new ways that smaller companies are entering the market for renewable energy? To find out, Clean Energy Finance Forum spoke with Jim Boyle, CEO and chairman of Sustainability Roundtable, Inc. Renewable energy certificates (RECs) are becoming an increasingly popular way for companies of a variety of sizes to reduce their carbon footprints. RECs also help companies support the production of renewable energy and meet or exceed their corporate-sustainability goals.
Juggler with three balls illustration

Juggling Approaches to Power Procurement

From batteries to blockchain, the energy sector is enjoying a period of rapid innovation with new technologies coming to market that carry the potential to upend traditional electric infrastructure and business models. Yet electric utilities and other electricity providers have been slow to adopt these novel technologies largely because they lack the information to fully weigh their options.