Topic: Tax Credits

Tax Credits Articles

Janine Benner

Oregon Takes a Strong Stand for Clean Energy

There is a strong groundswell of support for solar power and energy efficiency in Oregon. This has boosted the state’s programs and amplified their accomplishments, according to Janine Benner, director of Oregon Department of Energy. In this interview, she said Oregon is using these technologies to offset the environmental impact of its growing IT industry.
James Owen

Stakeholders in Missouri Debate Clean Energy’s Future

As Missouri’s clean energy policies go back and forth like a ball in a game, advocates are doing their best to negotiate, said James Owen, executive director of Renew Missouri, in this interview. Net metering and other policies are being actively debated by state decision makers. The outcome is still up in the air.
Library wall in Washington, DC

US Capital Targets Building Efficiency

Washington, DC is already on track to surpass the building energy efficiency goals it set seven years ago, according to the DC Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE). DOEE has achieved this through a unique public-private partnership participation in the Better Buildings Challenge. It also has a suite of other renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.
Solar panel on a home

Creative Ways to Finance Solar and Storage Systems

There was a full house when speakers offered strategic advice on energy storage financing at the Solar Power Northeast conference. Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) held this conference in Boston on Feb. 5-6. Solar energy storage systems are not yet widely used. And this lack of popularity can make storage systems difficult to finance.
Grand Central Terminal clock in New York City

As Some Federal Energy Incentives End, New York Takes Action

Quietly, while the United States focused on its national election, a set of federal clean energy incentives phased out at the end of 2016. Now that they have vanished, states may seek to create replacements to keep these markets alive and help them grow. For example, New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) is now strategically replacing the missing incentives for renewable heating and cooling.

Researchers Analyze the Recharged Solar Tax Credit

Just when it seemed as if the United States solar investment tax credit (ITC) was running out of energy, federal legislators charged it up for another few years last Friday. Barring other changes, by the time the credit winds down gradually, it will have put the national solar industry on a smooth glide toward a profitable future. The credit applies to both residential and commercial projects. It will taper from 30 percent through 2019 to 26 percent through 2020, 22 percent until 2022, and 10 percent thereafter.

Will California’s Successor Tariff Discourage New Residential Solar?

Solar installers, residential customers, utilities, and a host of other stakeholders in the residential solar market are waiting for the California Public Utilities Commission’s (CPUC) Net Energy Metering successor tariff (NEM 2.0), due by the end of 2015. The issue at hand is whether or not, and to what extent, those without solar are subsidizing those with solar by paying for grid upkeep and modernization. Because utilities fall on one side of the spectrum and nearly everyone else falls on the other, there is no love lost between stakeholders in the industry.

Citi Suggests Global Climate Investment Goals

On the surface, Citi’s recommendations of global climate investment goals, published in August in the report “Energy Darwinism II: Why a Low Carbon Future Doesn’t Have to Cost the Earth,” look deceptively simple. But a closer look at the patchwork of international regulations, legislation, and carbon markets reveals that financing clean energy in developing nations may be quite challenging to accomplish.