CEFF Homepage

Featured News

Latest Articles

So Cool It's Hot: Learn About Renewable Thermal Innovators in April

As most of us grow more intimate with the walls of our homes, the Renewable Thermal Alliance (RTA) offers views on updates to a clean-energy source six feet from where most of us sit. A public-private partnership initiated by New York State Energy Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), the Connecticut Green Bank, and Yale University, the RTA serves more than 300 individual stakeholders throughout the United States. The Alliance will soon announce its 2019 Innovation Grant recipients. Each one earned $15,000 to work on ways to make heat pumps and other renewable sources of heat more popular. Two webinars in April...
Ken Gillingham

Kenneth Gillingham, Associate Professor of Economics at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

CBEYond the Moment: Ken Gillingham

How can we shine a light on the smart choices for the long term in this confusing moment? Among other things, we can strike up conversation within our community. While most of us work from home and hang back from the ways we'd normally convene, we'll be sharing more insights from across the CBEY network. Here, economist Ken Gillingham lays out what the oil shock might mean for solar markets' progress- and how that progress can persevere.
A kook at trees that green bonds can support

Forests like this can grow in steadier fashion when ratings for green bonds become steadier as well. (Photo by David Gierth, accessed via Pexels.) 

Look for the Green Bond Label? The State of Green Bond Certification

Given the short history and dynamic state of the green bond market, wide variation exists in external review processes — based on regions, frameworks and evaluation parameters. Green bonds can fund energy, transportation, buildings or natural capital such as conservation. Work so far on certification shows how investors can keep building confidence and volume in this form of financing.
Tony DePrima's determined to lift fossil-free power standards in the First State.

Delaware energy leader Tony DePrima

As Solar and Efficiency Hold Steady, Delaware Aims to Up Renewables

Delaware consumes 100 times more energy than it produces, according to the Energy Information Administration, and gets 87% of its electricity from natural gas. The state’s renewables portfolio consists primarily of solar and biomass; a 120-megawatt offshore wind facility is expected to be online in 2022. CEFF spoke to Tony DePrima, executive director of the Delaware Sustainable Energy Utility (DSEU), about the state’s clean energy landscape.
Posigen installation in Bridgeport, CT

Installations from the Connecticut Green Bank's Posigen program in Bridgeport, CT / Courtesy of Connecticut Green Bank

Connecticut Green Bank's 'Green Liberty Bonds' Aim at Retail Climate Finance

In an interview with CEFF, the Connecticut Green Bank unveiled its plans to bring to market approximately $15 to 20 million of new $1,000 face value “Green Liberty Bonds” around April 22, in recognition of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. In a twist, the new bonds will be available not just to institutional investors but to retail investors throughout Connecticut and beyond.

Riding the Hype Cycle: Is Blockchain Still Key to a Better Energy System?

As more traditional venture capital and strategic investors are beginning to evaluate blockchain for the energy industry, feasible near-term use cases such as carbon credit tracking or management of utility assets may offer more immediate returns than ventures seeking to fundamentally reshape electricity markets around peer-to-peer trading.
Perspectives from State Experts
Photo of Dylan Voorhees

Dylan Voorhees / Photo courtesy of Natural Resources Council of Maine

Maine Prepares for Policy Shift Toward Clean Energy

Maine’s renewable energy landscape is poised for big changes. Legislation passed into law in June establishes greenhouse gas emission reduction targets and an ambitious renewable portfolio standard. In this interview, Dylan Voorhees, climate and clean energy director of the Natural Resources Council of Maine, explains what the new laws mean for the state, and what brought about the shift in policy.
David Campell

Photo courtesy of David Campbell.

Cost-Competitive Renewables Poised to Grow in Deregulated Texas Market

Texas offers an instructive case study for the growth of renewable energy. Most of the state’s electricity is delivered through the deregulated Electric Reliability Council of Texas market. The state has long since surpassed its mandated renewable portfolio standard, so market dynamics dictate the ongoing pace of renewables growth. Nonetheless, Texas is by far the country’s largest wind power generator and is slated to see major growth in solar capacity as well.