Tag: ACEEE

“Energy Efficiency for All” Supports Financial Resilience

Energy costs can impose a harsh burden on low-income families. Energy Efficiency for All (EEFA) is seeking to combat this adversity in 12 states with a combination of private and public funds. It is building up from a base of nonprofit commitment to create more partnerships, expand its work, and reach a large population of tenants and property owners.

A Hands-On Workshop on Energy Efficiency Financing Program Design

What does an effective energy efficiency financing program look like? On May 31 in San Francisco, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) convened 23 representatives from across the country in a workshop led by Cadmus Group. They explored current challenges facing program designers.

Could Behavior Change Insights Drive Demand for Energy Efficiency?

Proven strategies for encouraging customers to use new technologies and seek financing are critical to the diffusion of energy efficiency solutions. Even with financing, energy efficiency programs face significant hurdles in driving customer demand, particularly in the small- and medium-scale markets. The recent Behavior, Energy & Climate Conference (BECC) 2014 offered insights on customer motivation.

The Struggle to Combine Energy Efficiency and Solar Power

How can programs motivate homeowners to make their homes energy-efficient before installing solar panels? And how can incentives support a whole-house retrofit approach that will optimize energy savings and prevent solar systems from being oversized? California, Wisconsin, New Jersey, and Austin Energy have been grappling with this challenge for years. Their experiences show well-designed incentives may drive the joint adoption of solar power and energy efficiency. Simply introducing energy efficiency requirements into the solar installation process may not be successful without adding financial motivation.

Energy Efficiency Is a Ripe Market for Small to Mid-Size Lenders

Small energy-efficiency lenders face major obstacles including a lack of customer demand and data, a shortage of standardization metrics, regulatory hurdles, and an absence of underwriting standards, according to a report from the Small Lender Energy Efficiency Convening (SLEEC). The SLEEC took place in October 2013 when the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) and Energi convened a group of key stakeholders to explore the obstacles small lenders face and to identify opportunities for small and mid-size lender engagement in the energy efficiency lending market.