Tag: building codes

Joe Indvik

Joe Indvik

Policy Memo: Establishing a National Energy Benchmarking Standard for Commercial Buildings

To capture the energy efficiency opportunity across the U.S. economy, the House Energy and Commerce Committee should introduce a bill to establish a national energy benchmarking standard for commercial buildings. Building on the success of local ordinances, the proposed bill would create a national requirement while giving state and local governments the option to maintain more aggressive requirements if they desire.
Janine Benner

Oregon Takes a Strong Stand for Clean Energy

There is a strong groundswell of support for solar power and energy efficiency in Oregon. This has boosted the state’s programs and amplified their accomplishments, according to Janine Benner, director of Oregon Department of Energy. In this interview, she said Oregon is using these technologies to offset the environmental impact of its growing IT industry.

Northeastern States Map the Challenges of Electrification

The only way to achieve climate targets in the Northeast is to start electrifying transportation and heating to a high level. According to the report “Action Plan to Accelerate Strategic Electrification in the Northeast,” a committee of over 30 stakeholders is laying the groundwork for a massive revamp of the region’s electric power consumption to meet climate goals.

International Standards Are Tackling Climate Change Adaptation

Standards have immense leverage. They are a powerful way to slow the accelerating hazards of climate change. In November, during the side events at the 23rd Conference of the Parties in Bonn, Germany, participants discussed what to do to use standards development to help nations take action on their Nationally Determined Contributions.

Split Incentives May Not Reduce Commercial Energy Efficiency’s Value

When landlords make decisions about energy efficiency but tenants pay the costs, this creates a motivational problem known as the “split incentive.” Split incentives result in smaller investments in energy efficiency than would be economically efficient otherwise. A working paper, “Energy Codes and the Landlord-Tenant Problem,” explored this issue in April.