Kat Friedrich

Kat Friedrich
News Editor at Clean Energy Finance Forum and Conservation Finance Network

A former mechanical engineer with graduate training in journalism and environmental studies, Kat Friedrich is a self-employed news editor with expertise in energy, sustainability and technology.

In collaboration with graduate students and staff, Kat is expanding the articles, infographics and videos published by Clean Energy Finance Forum and Conservation Finance Network. These sites are experimenting with the latest innovations in online media and environmental communication. Both sites are using a "solutions journalism" approach to producing cutting-edge, pragmatic business news.

Yale University brought Clean Energy Finance Forum on board after Kat built its initial iteration for a small national NGO, Clean Energy Finance Center. The website has been growing since 2012.

Kat has also edited two magazines: BuildingEnergy and Renewable Energy World Magazine. Her reporting has appeared in Midwest Energy News, Scientific American, Earth Island Journal, and many other publications. She is a local co-organizer of Online News Association Western New England and the former organizer of NetSquared Boston.

Kat holds a master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Nelson Institute. Her thesis analyzed media framing of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge energy resources debate.

For close to two years, Kat worked for American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy on website strategy, technical writing, and environmental psychology research.

For four years, Kat was a writer and editor at the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching and Learning, a national initiative advancing diversity-friendly teaching techniques in science, technology, engineering and mathematics at colleges and universities.

As an engineer, Kat constructed parts for hybrid race cars before hybrid cars were on the market. She also built and tested HVAC systems to cool power electronics that were connected to utility power grids.

Authored Articles
Great Bay Wildlife Refuge in New Hampshire

Solar Hasn’t Won New Hampshire Over, But Efficiency Has

Although New Hampshire isn’t in the forefront of clean energy in New England, the solar power and energy efficiency industries are active there, according to Michael Behrmann, director of New Hampshire Clean Tech Council. In this interview, he said that some solar developers are working around bottlenecks at the state level by bypassing bureaucratic intervention. There is more state support for energy efficiency than for solar power.
Scott Quillinan

Wind Power Grows in Wyoming while Solar and Efficiency Wait

Wyoming is dipping a toe into the solar market this year for the first time. In the energy efficiency arena, it has not yet explored its potential. However, analysts predict it will become a leading wind-power state in a few years. Scott Quillinan, director of operations and communications at the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources, said in this interview that the state is experiencing differential growth in its clean energy markets.
Janine Benner

Oregon Takes a Strong Stand for Clean Energy

There is a strong groundswell of support for solar power and energy efficiency in Oregon. This has boosted the state’s programs and amplified their accomplishments, according to Janine Benner, director of Oregon Department of Energy. In this interview, she said Oregon is using these technologies to offset the environmental impact of its growing IT industry.
Alejandro Uriarte

Puerto Rico Climbs the Rocky Road toward Resilience

Since Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico has been a productive location for entrepreneurs who are eager to get involved in installing solar power and energy storage. One of them is Alejandro Uriarte, CEO of New Energy Consultants & Contractors. In this interview, he describes the rocky road that the island territory has encountered as it seeks to build out clean energy.
Darcy Jones

Economic Development Meets Clean Energy in South Carolina

Integrating socioeconomically inclusive behavior is a strong point of South Carolina’s clean energy programs. Three staffers at South Carolina Energy Office, Energy Policy Analyst Darcy Jones (the primary source), Deputy Director of Energy Maeve Mason, and Energy Specialist Stacey Washington, completed a joint written interview where they shared insights about how to protect low-to-moderate-income consumers.
Ivan Urlaub

Fragmented Policies Hold Back Energy Innovation in North Carolina

Given the regulatory and policy challenges North Carolina faces, it takes patience for the solar power and energy efficiency industries to move forward there. According to staff at North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association, Duke Energy is taking the lead with developing some opportunities, but other utilities are lagging behind it. The respondents to this written interview were Executive Director Ivan Urlaub (the primary source), General Counsel Peter Ledford, Regulatory and Policy Analyst Daniel Brookshire, and Engagement and Equity Specialist Jordan Jones.
Seattle hospital

Rain Doesn’t Prevent Washington’s Solar Market from Growing

Although Washington may not look like a prime location for solar power, the market is growing reliably, according to Washington Department of Commerce staff Glenn Blackmon, senior energy policy specialist; Dever Haffner-Ratliffe, program and grant manager; and Seth Kolodziejski, policy and contracts supervisor. In this joint written interview, they said utilities and the state are building energy efficiency programs and exploring electrification strategies.
Ken Hughes

How Can New Mexico Transform Its Energy Mix?

New Mexico needs to modernize its rates, regulations and incentives so it can make substantial progress in improving its solar-energy and energy efficiency markets, said Ken Hughes, clean energy specialist at the State of New Mexico’s Energy Conservation and Management Division. In this interview, he provided examples of success stories on the ground.
James Owen

Stakeholders in Missouri Debate Clean Energy’s Future

As Missouri’s clean energy policies go back and forth like a ball in a game, advocates are doing their best to negotiate, said James Owen, executive director of Renew Missouri, in this interview. Net metering and other policies are being actively debated by state decision makers. The outcome is still up in the air.