Topic: Climate Resilience

Climate Resilience Articles

External News

Electric Utilities Can’t Blame Wildfires Solely on Climate, Experts Say

Bill Johnson is a utility executive, not a climate scientist. That didn’t stop the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E) CEO from wading into California’s complex climate conditions. Noting that Northern California’s wildfire risk has grown exponentially in recent years, Johnson placed much of the blame on climate change, not PG&E’s compromised electricity grid.
External News

Electric Utilities Can’t Blame Wildfires Solely on Climate, Experts Say

Bill Johnson is a utility executive, not a climate scientist. That didn’t stop the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E) CEO from wading into California’s complex climate conditions. Noting that Northern California’s wildfire risk has grown exponentially in recent years, Johnson placed much of the blame on climate change, not PG&E’s compromised electricity grid.
Commentary

How Much Credit Does RGGI Deserve for the Northeast’s Progress on Emissions?

Northeast states participating in a regional carbon pricing compact are cutting power sector emissions and growing their economies faster than most states. As the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative turns 10, though, some analysts and advocates warn against attributing too much recent progress to the program.
Smokestacks

Lowell, MA / Curran Kelleher / CC BY 2.0

Startup Opus 12 Pilots Carbon Conversion Technology

What if excess carbon in the atmosphere could be converted to more useful forms? That’s the ultimate goal of carbon conversion companies such as Opus 12, a startup in Berkeley, California. Making stuff out of carbon dioxide could be a trillion-dollar industry by 2030, and it creates an economic incentive to start removing carbon from the atmosphere sooner rather than later, which is a critical piece of most scenarios for limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius.
External News

Ohio Voters Support Climate Action

A new survey finds Ohio voters support a broad array of policies to address climate impacts and increase production of renewable energy in the state, and want their elected officials to support those policies.
Greta Thunberg at New York City climate strike

Climate activist Greta Thunberg at New York City's Climate Strike in September 2019. (AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez.)

Part V: Building the Low-Carbon Future

These policies, taken together and adopted at national scale, would allow the United States to do its part in limiting global warming to 1.5°C. Can it be done? The final installment of “Look to the States” concludes with an outlook and some tools — drawing once more from state-level successes — for putting a decarbonization plan into practice.
Rooftop solar installers in CO

Workers install rooftop solar panels at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Research Support Facility in Golden, CO in 2013 / U.S. Department of Energy

Part III: A Modernized, Efficient and Equitable Electric Grid

States across the country have led efforts to revamp the electric grid: modernizing century-old systems, promoting energy efficiency, and investing in distributed energy generation that replaces central grids. Through smart investment and incentives, the federal government has the ability to usher in this new energy future nationwide, and ensure that all share equitably in the benefits — and that those who suffer from the highest energy burden receive the most help.
Block Island Wind Farm

Block Island Wind Farm / Chris Bentley / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Part II: Setting Climate Targets and Creating Tools to Achieve Them

For years, red and blue states across the country have been building the policy architecture for ambitious national climate action. Part II of "Searching for a New Deal on Climate" explores how the federal government can follow the states’ lead on setting economy-wide greenhouse gas targets, establishing renewable energy requirements for electric utility portfolios, and building out new renewable energy generation.
Brayton Point

Demolition of Brayton Point, the last coal-fired power plant in Massachusetts, in April 2019. The location will serve as a site for future offshore wind development. (Dave Souza/The Herald News of Fall River via AP)

Part I: Searching for a New Deal on Climate? Look to the States

Is there a version of decarbonization somewhere out there that is aggressive enough to meet the bar set by the scientists, yet pragmatic enough to work politically and as a matter of law and policy? Yes, there is. We should look no further than the blue and red states that are currently leading on climate to see the strategies in action that would achieve the swift and far-reaching emissions reductions we require.
Global Thermostat's Menlo Park, CA Plant

Global Thermostat co-founder Graciela Chichilnisky at the company's demo plant in Menlo Park, California / Photo courtesy of Global Thermostat

ExxonMobil and Global Thermostat Look to Scale Carbon Capture

This summer, ExxonMobil announced it would be working with carbon removal company Global Thermostat to help scale up their technology, with an eye towards large industrial applications. The announcement is the latest indicator that fossil fuel companies are looking ahead towards a world that’s far less friendly towards their products and the emissions they produce.