Filtered Topic: Community-Based Marketing

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Enough for everyone

Now that we needn't think of solar as an "alternative" source, we also can find alternatives to a system in which way more of solar goes to affluent whites.

Demanding Upstanding Solar Supply: Two Pioneers Chart Paths to Energy Justice

Look behind the dominant curve, on which solar power becomes cheaper to supply while corporate commitments, voters' priorities and scientific data goose demand for solar. You'll see that too many people find themselves locked out of the solar market or barred from influencing its direction. Two speakers challenged Yale audiences to expand the curve's cone of inclusion.
Joe Biden

A policy leader says the President-elect has emphasized environmental justice because no recovery will take off without it. 

When Aiming for "Better," Says Expert, It's Best to Focus on Delivering Justice

Energy without emissions causes more job creation and less climate risks. To expand across the recovering nation, energy needs to come with priorities, prices and placements that emphasize justice for people who have lived with systematic racism. In this summary and exploration, scholar Dan Kammen lays out the case for a justice-driven recovery. CBEY will explore this case more fully with Shalanda Baker and other scholars later this month.
View from an arch in Mexico

What Will It Take to Catalyze the Energy Transition?

Vastly higher clean energy targets are essential to empower the international community to make the leap to a sustainable future, according to Richard Heinberg, coauthor of “Our Renewable Future: Laying the Path for One Hundred Percent Clean Energy.” In this interview, he delves into the practical challenges involved in the global transition to renewable power sources.
Solar panels on a building with a boarded window

How Solar Can Expand Its Socioeconomic Reach

Innovative solutions can help solar companies reach the low-to-moderate-income market, according to a report from Vote Solar. According to 2016 Census and FICO data, 44-78 million people in the United States qualify as low-income and/or low-credit. But many of these customers are being left out of the clean energy transition because of financial barriers to securing access to solar products.